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    Acky

    Thanks again. Awesome site.

    Acky

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    Acky

    Ronnie,

    I did perform the lab on EIGRP and I did see the advertising of only one interface in the 'show IP Protocols' command, but I cannot find any difference when it comes to reaching anything on the network attached to that interface.

    So, I am still at a loss for understanding why (besides understanding it for the exam) you wouldn't just advertise the interface since it's easier to implement and it still allows routing to connected network. When you advertise the one interface, it is advertising more than necessary?

    So in production, you do not advertise- just the interface?

    Acky

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    Acky

    Ronnie,

    OK, I can see in your example that the 172.16.0.0 0.0.0.0 statement is really "overriding" the other network statement.

    But in your examples, you have always given a network or subnet ID in the statements. What I wasn't clear on was the fact that with a single interface address and a 32 bit wildcard mask in the network statement, that you would be advertising every network attached to that interface. Or more so, you would be advertising every network within that classful address, as well?

    I can see where that could cause problems and/or limitations.

    Thanks
    Acky

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    Acky

    Hi Ronnie,

    In your example,
    What networks will be advertised out?
    For network 172.16.0.0 0.0.0.0
    I would say the whole class B network of 172.16.0.0 would be advertised.

    What if I don't want 172.16.63.0/24 to be advertised out.
    Then I would give a network statement like: network 172.16.64.0 0.0.0.255

    What if I only want 172.16.0.0/24 to be advertised out.
    How would I configure this with the above configuration?
    I would then provide: network 172.16.0.0 0.0.0.255

    thanks, Acky

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    Acky

    Ronnie,

    I understand what you're saying and can see the difference in your example. But what network are you advertising when you list the specific IP address of the interface?
    Such as : router eigrp 1
    network 172.16.96.1 0.0.0.0
    no auto summary

    Does the router figure out what subnet this is attached to and only limit it to that? Or are you saying it 'opens" it up to the classful address, or something else?
    It the listing of the specific interface address with the network command that has me hung up.

    Again, I know, it's the wildcard masks I should be focused on for the test, but I would like to understand this better.

    Oh, and Lee- thanks, I did find the spot in the Official Cert Guide (R&S INCD2 200-105), page 249. you referenced. It didn't give any details as to the pros or cons.

    Thanks for all the help.

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    Acky

    Thanks,

    I understand the need to know wildcard masking for the exam. I don't have any problems figuring out the wildcard mask. I just thought it was interesting that you could apply it in this manner and in production, I thought it would make it simpler.

    Ronnie, you say it advertises more than needed. Wow! I am trying to get my head wrapped around that. Could you be more specific or provide examples. When you advertise using the interface- what subnet are you actually advertising? I am not sure what you mean- or how it does advertise more. Thanks for all your help.

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    Acky

    I read (though I haven't found confirmation from the Cisco site) that the best practice for advertising EIGRP networks is to really just advertise the interface on which that network is connected. So instead of figuring out the proper wildcard mask to use in advertising a network, just copy the IP address of the interface and give it s wildcard mask of '0.0.0.0'.
    So the first step would be to perform a 'show ip interface brief', then enter the router EIGRP configuration mode. After which you enter your network statements for those interfaces you wish to advertise out.
    Example: router EIGRP 100
    network 192.168.16.2 0.0.0.0
    network 172.14.0.1 0.0.0.0
    This works great.

    In the practice labs, I have use this configuration procedure for both EIGRP and OSPF and I cannot see the downside to doing it this way. I am wondering what is the drawback with using this procedure for either protocol. Thanks and Great work!

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    Acky

    No, not in a time crunch. I wanted to see of any timelines were known, or if I was missing anything being broadcast. Thanks
    Congrats on the new studio. Looking forward to the future broadcasts.

    Acky

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    Acky

    Are you producing the end segments of the CCNA R&S course now? I thought I read in an email that you would be streaming this course Live this week. I cannot quite make it around to watch. I see that two segments in the course, Infrastructure Services and Infrastructure Maintenance have yet to be produced. I was just wondering if there was a timeframe as to when we can expect the content to begin to be posted online.

    Anxious to view it. Thanks
    Acky

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    Acky

    FOLLOW-UP Questions and comment: So, In watching the episode further. (I have got to do something about my impatience), I see that management traffic will continue to reside on Vlan 1, whether it is currently the native vlan or not. I am assuming, this is built in as a default or maybe, cannot even be changed?
    Other than that, I also assume that any new device connection to an access port- operationally, you would assign to some vlan- other than 1?
    You stated that the vlan 1, as the native vlan, is changed on your trunks, which leads me to believe, vlan 1 is kept as the native vlan across the switches otherwise?

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