• David Beem

    As an aside, Episode 90 of Coding 101 on TWiT (recorded today, 2 Nov 2015) interviews several Microsoft PowerShell MVPs on how they started, the jobs they are in, and even some resources that Microsoft has for PowerShell.

    posted in Microsoft read more
  • David Beem

    For subnetting practice, I like the site recommended by another viewer: http://www.subnetting.net/Subnetting.aspx?mode=practice

    It's a great way to get into that frame of mind, where you can also verify you can do the easier questions in your head, and how quick your reaction speed and accuracy is. Just read the question fully.

    posted in Microsoft read more
  • David Beem

    I agree it's broken, even to the simplistic Chrome OS. At best, I can set a Chrome option to "Ask where to save each file before downloading" to chose an external SATA drive (Chromebooks and Chromeboxes typically have an SSD drive that isn't a large capacity), but it only prompts for a location at the end of each download. My concern is I don't know where it is buffering the file(s) during download, and I want to have as few write-cycles as possible.

    posted in General Discussion read more
  • David Beem

    Having different subnet values (yet still being a part of the same network) does not eliminate an IP address conflict. You could have two (or more) VLANs (which are separate networks) where your scenario would be possible on a more advanced switch. Note that NAT may not be involved with public-side addresses; if it is the same IP address on separate equipment then it should be separate networks.

    posted in CompTIA read more
  • David Beem

    ...Most newer switches have Auto MDI-X ports that detect whether MDI or MDI-X is needed and set the interface appropriately.

    Rick (and Ronnie) are very good in their descriptions, however I would add an incident I experienced in the field. A switch would lose connectivity to an end device on one port. Power-cycling the switch cleared the issue for about a half-hour. It turns out that the cable was a crossover, and the switch would fail only on that "auto-flip" capability after that period of time. Replacing the cable (actually re-terminating it at one end) with the needed straight-through type solved it completely.

    posted in CompTIA read more
  • David Beem

    The other question was to find out what the largest contiguous ( or continuous) block was for the remaining hosts. I don't understand what that question means. Could anyone of you help explain what "largest contiguous block" is?

    If you add up the hosts for the 4 subnets 35+ 67 + 12 + 30 = 144 hosts (out of 254 possible in a /24 network). The largest contiguous block that you could get here would [be a network] with a /25 (126 hosts)

    I interpret the question as provided a Class C network (/24), what is the largest subnet after allocating the previously determined subnets (one of each: /25, /26/, /27, and /28). A /28 subnet (with 14 possible hosts) is the largest remaining block of the Class C, and completes the allocation of subnets for the entire /24 space. Of the results, the two /28 networks are adjacent to each other, that pair is adjacent to the /27 block, which as a group are adjacent to the /26 subnet, which as a group are half of the Class C network opposite the /25 subnet.

    posted in CompTIA read more
  • David Beem

    Good advice so far - my pfSense installation was made much easier because I work for the ISP that provides my DSL line. They (meaning your provider) might be best to direct your initial questions of how you are assigned public-side IP(s). As mentioned, what device connects to your ISP, and what type of Internet connection is it? pfSense does even have the abilities to "spoof" a MAC address (i.e. what could be on the cable modem to authenticate), which may be required in some situations.

    posted in General Discussion read more
  • David Beem

    It can become just the convention that you (or the place you work for) adopts (like whether you wire 568A or 568B) if you do a bunch of subnets. I'm usually a "broadcast address minus one" (and 568B) guy. Don't get trapped into thinking it is all a /24 world.

    A good subnetting practice link is http://www.subnetting.net/Subnetting.aspx?mode=practice, some questions will ask the first and last valid host addresses, which will be where either camp (network address plus one, or broadcast address minus one) will place their gateways....

    posted in Cisco read more
  • David Beem

    @Moshe-D. For when they send you a shirt. :smiley:

    posted in General Discussion read more
  • David Beem

    "Note that Mac OS includes OpenSSH by default": http://www.openssh.com/macos.html

    posted in Apple read more